Our Family History


Print Bookmark

Notes


Matches 551 to 597 of 597

      «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12

 #   Notes   Linked to 
551 Thomas inheritied "Nant Gwylan" from his uncle, his mother Anne's brother in 1807. Family F0199
 
552 Thomas was an Irish MP before the Union with England. Barton, Thomas (I0243)
 
553 Tom died of a cerebral metastases and carcinoma of the oesophagus.
Death certificate number: 5618/1998 
Edmiston, Tom (I0023)
 
554 Tony was a grazier. Single, Eric Anthony Vallack (Tony) (I1330)
 
555 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I0176)
 
556 Unit embarked from Sydney, on board HMAT A41 Bakara. Lake, Joseph (I0042)
 
557 Unmarried. Served his apprenticeship with the Government Printing Office in Sydney. Later edited the Port Macquarie News for Reverend Robert Davidson. Blair, Herbert Henry (I0236)
 
558 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I0174)
 
559 Violetta and Harry were both accomplished musicians. He played the flute and built that pump organ into their enormous home in Bellevue Hill. Our grandfather and his three brothers had to take turns pumping for him as he played the organ. Violetta accompanied him on the piano. Corbett, Violetta Emily (Lottie) (I0173)
 
560 Violetta's father Henry was an exceptional artist and drank a lot.
He died at age 46.
His occupation on Violeta's birth certificate was listed as "Operator, Electric Telegraph Dept" 
Corbett, Henry (I0185)
 
561 Was a Chamber Magistrate Hibble, Alfred Edward (I0599)
 
562 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1430)
 
563 Was POW.
Brigader General. 
Marlan, Robert F (I0318)
 
564 When Governor Macquarie formed the first regular police force in Australia into which Frederick was appointed as Constable. He later became the first Chief Constable at Liverpool. Merideth, Frederick (I0195)
 
565 When he was selected as one and became a member of the Loyal Sydney Association under the command of William Balmain.

Following reports of intended rebellion by the Irish convicts, Governor Hunter issued an order commanding 'all civil officers and such housekeepers who are freemen, possessing property, and good characters in the town of Sydney to assemble and from amongst these, fifty men were to be chosen as armed-police under the command of the 'civil officers'. Frederick Meredith was selected as one and became a member of the Loyal Sydney Association under the command of William Balmain. They were enrolled on the condition that 'they are not to expect pay for the voluntary offer of their services'. The existence of this "militia force" was not continuous but it existed for varying periods over the next 10 years. 
Merideth, Frederick (I0195)
 
566 When WWII broke out, Arthur, who was only 16, put his age up and joined the army. He enlisted first in the16th Battalion (Cameron Highlanders) thinking it would be easier to join the AIF by transferring from a militia regiment. Few, Arthur Edward (I0820)
 
567 While touring Australia in 1902, Paterson met Alice Emily Walker at Tenterfield Station in northern New South Wales. He married her at the station on April 8, 1903. They made their home in Woolahra, a suburb of Sydney after he was appointed editor of the Sydney Evening News. His two children were born during this period. Looking for a less stressful and confining life, he resigned as editor and bought "Coodra", a property in the Yass district. This decision ended in failure and Paterson turned for a short time to wheat farming at Grenfell. Family F0054
 
568 Will proved 1799 Gowing, John (I1688)
 
569 Will proved in 1788. Gowing, John (I1690)
 
570 William Barton was married to Jean Hannah Ffoster and his father was Anthony Barton, [possibly of Barton Hall Lancashire England according to one family account but unlikely in view of all the Plantation Landowners in this Barony being from Norfolk]. William Barton's estate included all of Boa Island plus the townland of Curraghmore near Pettigo and the Island of Cruninish near Boa Island. William Barton died on February 22nd 1693 and is buried in Carne Graveyard outside Pettigo along with his son Edward. William of Boa Island had two sons Edward and William the second son. Edward inherited Cruninish and Boa Island while William who inherited Curraghmore from his father married Elizabeth Dickson of Ballyshannon. Their son Tom became famous as "French Tom" because he went off to Bordeaux in France and founded the famous wine firm of B. and G. or Barton and Guestier which is today one of the most famous wine firms in France. "French Tom" claimed that he acquired his business acumen from his uncles Thomas and William Dickson who were merchants in Ballyshannon. The town of Ballyshannon was a notable port at this time and there was quite a lot of trade between the west of Ireland and the west of France. Brandy, wine and silk was imported and wool, fish and agricultural produce were exported. In times of strain between France and England trade was officially stopped but smuggling was ever present.
"French Tom" was born on the 21st of December, 1695, at his father's house at Curraghmore and sent to school in Ballyshannon. He was married on the 1st of November 1722 to Margaret Delap of Ballyshannon and his only child William was born in Anna Delap's house in Ballyshannon on the 5th of August 1723. When Thomas Barton emigrated to France he worked as a factor at Marseille and Montpelier before moving to Bordeaux and founding his wine firm when he was about thirty years old. It was not until the period of the French Revolution that the name Guestier became associated with that of Barton the wine merchants. The Reign of Terror, as it is called during the French Revolution, engulfed Bordeaux as much as it did Paris and other cities in France and many were imprisoned or sent to the guillotine where their heads were cut off. Hugh Barton who was then owner of the Barton firm was imprisoned along with many other leading merchants and like them, his offices and books were sealed with the seal of the Revolutionary Committee. He was imprisoned in Fort du Ha but escaped with the aid of his wife and before fleeing the country assisted in burning the guillotine in Bordeaux. As an alien he was no longer allowed to hold property in France or have a business there and he arranged with Daniel Guestier to manage his business in Bordeaux while he managed it's affairs in Britain. Barton placed great trust in Guestier for at any time Guestier could have seized the business as his own. Eventually when some degree of normality returned a partnership was drawn up between the two men in 1802 which continues between their descendants today. In 1830 both men brought their eldest sons into the partnership and descendants of these remarkable men still control the firm of Barton and Guestier.

Back in Ireland the Barton lands came into the possession of the descendants of "French Tom" and indeed were added to locally and in other places in Ireland. In1754 Sir James Caldwell sold the lands of Coolacha near amounting to 115 acres to Thomas Barton of Bordeaux i.e. "French Tom" and he also bought the Kilmore Estate of 15,500 acres and until this the Bartons did not really have much land in Ireland. "French Tom" and his only son William did not see eye to eye and he moved to the Grove Estate, Fethard, Co. Tipperary. He married there and left 6 sons and 3 daughters. The sons were Thomas, William, Charles, Hugh, Robert and Dunbar while the girls were Lady Palliser, Lady Massey and Lady Fitzgerald.

On the demise of their father the Grove Estate was inherited by Thomas, the Waterfoot Estate by General Charles Barton and the Clonelly Estate by William Barton. Locally therefore the Waterfoot and Clonelly Estates descended between two branches of the family and their respective estates of the Waterfoot and Clonelly owned separate shares of Boa Island. The western half of Boa Island belonged to the Bartons of the Waterfoot and the easterly half to the Bartons of Clonelly.

In 1845 just before famine struck Ireland there was a great deal of unrest in the countryside. Such was the unrest of the time that a notice of a reward of £1000 was printed in the Ballyshannon Herald for information received in regard to Ribbonmen or Molly Maguires in the local countryside. In a celebrated murder attempt of the day Folliott W Barton J.P. one of the Bartons of Clonelly was the intended victim of an attack and the entire weight of the law of the country descended on the locality in an effort to suppress what was considered the beginning of an uprising. As the newspaper reports the events Mr F.W. Barton had been on his way home to Clonelly near Pettigo when he had been shot. He had been on horseback coming from his relatives house at the Waterfoot. An immediate reward was posted for the capture of the assassin. In the same newspaper edition of November 1845 it states that a great rot has set in among the potatoes and that the crop failure earlier reported from England now seemed to be in Ireland. On January 9th of 1846 the Ballyshannon Herald reports that two brothers by the name of Fitzpatrick were now lodged in Enniskillen Jail on suspicion of the attempted assassination. One of them James Fitzpatrick was in fact now dead and the other still protesting their innocence. They just happened to be passing along the road at the time and the newspaper comments in their defence that they had always been thought to have been loyal Protestants. In those days just to be put in jail could easily be a death sentence. 
Barton, William (Bowe Island) (I0383)
 
571 William Barton was married to Jean Hannah Ffoster and his father was Anthony Barton, [possibly of Barton Hall Lancashire England according to one family account but unlikely in view of all the Plantation Landowners in this Barony being from Norfolk]. William Barton's estate included all of Boa Island plus the townland of Curraghmore near Pettigo and the Island of Cruninish near Boa Island. William Barton died on February 22nd 1693 and is buried in Carne Graveyard outside Pettigo along with his son Edward. William of Boa Island had two sons Edward and William the second son. Edward inherited Cruninish and Boa Island while William who inherited Curraghmore from his father married Elizabeth Dickson of Ballyshannon. Their son Tom became famous as "French Tom" because he went off to Bordeaux in France and founded the famous wine firm of B. and G. or Barton and Guestier which is today one of the most famous wine firms in France. "French Tom" claimed that he acquired his business acumen from his uncles Thomas and William Dickson who were merchants in Ballyshannon. The town of Ballyshannon was a notable port at this time and there was quite a lot of trade between the west of Ireland and the west of France. Brandy, wine and silk was imported and wool, fish and agricultural produce were exported. In times of strain between France and England trade was officially stopped but smuggling was ever present.

"French Tom" was born on the 21st of December, 1695, at his father's house at Curraghmore and sent to school in Ballyshannon. He was married on the 1st of November 1722 to Margaret Delap of Ballyshannon and his only child William was born in Anna Delap's house in Ballyshannon on the 5th of August 1723. When Thomas Barton emigrated to France he worked as a factor at Marseille and Montpelier before moving to Bordeaux and founding his wine firm when he was about thirty years old. It was not until the period of the French Revolution that the name Guestier became associated with that of Barton the wine merchants. The Reign of Terror, as it is called during the French Revolution, engulfed Bordeaux as much as it did Paris and other cities in France and many were imprisoned or sent to the guillotine where their heads were cut off. Hugh Barton who was then owner of the Barton firm was imprisoned along with many other leading merchants and like them, his offices and books were sealed with the seal of the Revolutionary Committee. He was imprisoned in Fort du Ha but escaped with the aid of his wife and before fleeing the country assisted in burning the guillotine in Bordeaux. As an alien he was no longer allowed to hold property in France or have a business there and he arranged with Daniel Guestier to manage his business in Bordeaux while he managed it's affairs in Britain. Barton placed great trust in Guestier for at any time Guestier could have seized the business as his own. Eventually when some degree of normality returned a partnership was drawn up between the two men in 1802 which continues between their descendants today. In 1830 both men brought their eldest sons into the partnership and descendants of these remarkable men still control the firm of Barton and Guestier.

Back in Ireland the Barton lands came into the possession of the descendants of "French Tom" and indeed were added to locally and in other places in Ireland. In1754 Sir James Caldwell sold the lands of Coolacha near amounting to 115 acres to Thomas Barton of Bordeaux i.e. "French Tom" and he also bought the Kilmore Estate of 15,500 acres and until this the Bartons did not really have much land in Ireland. "French Tom" and his only son William did not see eye to eye and he moved to the Grove Estate, Fethard, Co. Tipperary. He married there and left 6 sons and 3 daughters. The sons were Thomas, William, Charles, Hugh, Robert and Dunbar while the girls were Lady Palliser, Lady Massey and Lady Fitzgerald.

On the demise of their father the Grove Estate was inherited by Thomas, the Waterfoot Estate by General Charles Barton and the Clonelly Estate by William Barton. Locally therefore the Waterfoot and Clonelly Estates descended between two branches of the family and their respective estates of the Waterfoot and Clonelly owned separate shares of Boa Island. The western half of Boa Island belonged to the Bartons of the Waterfoot and the easterly half to the Bartons of Clonelly. 
Barton, William (Bowe Island) (I0383)
 
572 William inheritied "Gilfach" farm from his mother. Jones, William (I1009)
 
573 William was a Wine Merchant, Skinner Street, Bishopsgate, London. Witt, William (I0736)
 
574 William, who seems to have been a difficult and quarrelsome fellow, did not get on with his father and spent most of his time in Ireland, on his fathers estates and in Dublin. Barton, William (I0240)
 
575 Wine merchant Barton, Hugh (I0247)
 
576 With ashes spread at house at Fullerton Cove. Marlan, Joyce Narelle (I0041)
 
577 Worked for CSR. Moved to North Queensland for work. Davies, Colin Campbell (I0345)
 
578 Worked for the Colonial East India Co. Martin, George (I0775)
 
579 Worked on railway construction with horses and drays.
Worked for Lake Macquarie Shire Council.
Retired from council in 1949. 
Sweet, William Henry (I0325)
 
580 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I0853)
 
581 [BDM ref# 11818] Family F0013
 
582 [BDM ref# 12325/1865] Lonsdale, Mary Ann (I1580)
 
583 [BDM ref# 12489] Allen, Mona (I0043)
 
584 [BDM ref# 12765/1949] Lonsdale, Mary Ann (I1580)
 
585 [BDM ref# 15305/1872] Allen, Alfred Arthur (I0622)
 
586 [BDM ref# 15600/1872] Bellamy, Isabella Amy (I1583)
 
587 [BDM ref# V184232126c] Family F0587
 
588 [BDM ref#12997/1903] Lake, John (I0642)
 
589 [BDM ref#13005/1898] Lake, Joseph (I0042)
 
590 [BDM ref#15795/1941] Allen, Alfred Arthur (I0622)
 
591 [BDM ref#2536/1863] Family F0584
 
592 [BDM ref#3351/1870] Family F0586
 
593 [BDM ref#3413] Family F0585
 
594 [BDM ref#6494/1891] Family F0218
 
595 [BDM ref#6944/1888] Family F0227
 
596 [BDM ref#7356/1918] Hockley, Susan (nah) (I1587)
 
597 [BDM ref#V18491908 34A/1849] Hockley, Susan (nah) (I1587)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12


This site powered by The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding ©, v. 11.0.1, written by Darrin Lythgoe 2001-2018.